Reviewed: 2015

Thraliana - The diary of Mrs Hester Lynch Thrale

  • Posted on: 11 October 2009
  • By: David Thrale

Written by Hester Lynch Thrale. Published 1951 by Oxford at the Clarendon Press. Edited by Katherine C. Balderston When Hester was thirty-five years old, her husband Henry gave her a set of six handsome quarto blank books, bound in undressed calf, each bearing on its cover a red label stamped in gold with the title Thraliana. This took place in 1776, a few weeks before their thirteenth wedding anniversary. Thraliana is a collection of Hester Lynch Thrale's thoughts, experiences and some of her verses from this period of her life. It was important because it was almost, if not quite, the first English Ana.

Thrales End

  • Posted on: 26 September 2009
  • By: David Thrale

The Thrale family originated around the Hundred of Flitt in Bedfordshire and of its parishes Clophill, Barton, Gravenhurst (Upper & Lower). Higher Gobian and Pulloxhill are of special significance, but paramount is the parish of Luton with its manors of East and West Hyde which border on to the hamlet of Thrale's End. Thrales End is a little hamlet on the Bedfordshire / Hertfordshire border, north of Harpenden, four miles from Sandridge and five miles from St Albans.

This page also contains details of the earliest records for Thrales from 1309 until 1616.

Streatham Park

  • Posted on: 26 September 2009
  • By: David Thrale

Streatham Park, or Streatham Place, was built in 1730 by Ralph Thrale (1698-1758) on 89 acres of land bought from the local Lord of the Manor - the fourth Duke of Bedford. It was rumoured that the sale price was a ten-year supply of ale and porter for the Duke's home

Thrales of Sandridge

  • Posted on: 24 September 2009
  • By: David Thrale

Robert Thrale held Tuffnalls at Thrale's End in 1493. From Robert the elder descended the Thrale family that became the most prominent family in Sandridge over the next 300 years. John Cussans' History of Hertfordshire (1870-1881) says…

Few yeoman families could boast a more respectable ancestry.

Hester's death

  • Posted on: 24 September 2009
  • By: David Thrale

Later in 1820 Hester took residence in Royal York Crescent, Clifton, Bristol. Clifton was the home of her friend Penelope Sophia Weston (1752-1827), wife of William Pennington. For a short while after this she took temporary residence in Regents Terrace, Penzance while repairs were made to her house in Clifton. On her journey of return to Clifton in March 1821, she fell and hurt her leg in Exeter.

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